ATDC Company SimCraft’s Product Featured in Iron Man 2

When Tony Stark – a genius engineer and the hero of Marvel Studios’ new film Iron Man 2 – needed to train for the Monaco Grand Prix, only a top-notch racing simulator would suffice. Although Stark lives in a world inhabited by superheroes, he obtained the innovative technology in Atlanta from SimCraft, a member of Georgia Tech’s Advanced Technology Development Center (ATDC).

The SimCraft APEX racing simulator is visible on the left side of Tony Stark’s workshop/garage (Prologue Films VFX for Marvel Studios).

The SimCraft APEX racing simulator is featured prominently in the Iron Man 2 film, along with a number of unique cars and a folding wing aircraft. SimCraft produces a low-cost, military-grade, full-motion simulator that provides a simulated G-force for SimRacing and FlightSim at home. The system features a patent-pending chassis that rotates around three degrees of freedom. At its most advanced setup, the system allows the cockpit’s occupant to yaw up to 50 degrees to the left and right, pitch up to 30 degrees fore and aft, and roll up to 50 degrees port and starboard.

“The simulator shows up in three scenes, and in one scene in particular it takes up almost half the screen,” said Sean Patrick MacDonald, SimCraft’s co-founder. “The property master of the film, Russell Bobbitt, asked if they could have Tony Stark use the simulator as a prop and mark it as a Stark Industries creation. My response? Absolutely!”

Iron Man 2 marks a measure of success for an innovator’s son who is, like Stark, carrying on with his late father’s cutting-edge technology company. SimCraft was originally a retirement business for MacDonald’s father William; however, after his death in early 2002, Sean Patrick decided to expand upon his father’s mission. That expansion has brought SimCraft to its present day growth and cameo appearance in the film.

In this sequel to the blockbuster film based on the legendary Marvel superhero, the world is now aware that billionaire inventor Tony Stark (Robert Downey, Jr.) is the armored Iron Man. Under pressure from the government, the press, and the public to share his technology with the military, Tony is unwilling to divulge the secrets behind the Iron Man armor because he fears the information will slip into the wrong hands. However, he doesn’t let these concerns stop him from racing at Monaco, where he confronts this fear in the form of evil genius Whiplash (Mickey Rourke) armed with energy whips.

In anticipation of the premiere, SimCraft hosted a simulated racing event with those who helped make the film possible. The SimCraft APEX shows up in the background and foreground of the workshop scenes in the movie.

About SimCraft:

SimCraft’s core innovation and technology is the simulation of vehicle movement. The company’s proprietary software and patent pending hardware provide realistic, zero latency motion™ for racing and flight simulation. This high performance system provides an unparalleled virtual environment from training applications by honing technical skills and experimentation with vehicle setups to the ultimate in pure entertainment. For more information about SimCraft’s advanced motion technology, visit http://www.SimCraft.com.

 

About the ATDC:

The Advanced Technology Development Center (ATDC) is a startup accelerator that helps Georgia technology entrepreneurs launch and build successful companies. Founded in 1980, ATDC has helped create millions of dollars in tax revenues by graduating more than 120 companies, which together have raised more than a billion dollars in outside financing. ATDC has provided business incubation and acceleration services to hundreds of Georgia startups – most of which are not based on Georgia Tech research, but which benefit from the close proximity to the university.

Recently ATDC expanded its mission by merging with Georgia Tech’s VentureLab and with the Georgia Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Assistance Program.  This change has enabled ATDC to greatly extend its reach to serve more technology companies along multiple growth paths and at all stages of development.  ATDC has opened its membership to all technology entrepreneurs in Georgia, from those at the earliest conception stage to the well-established, venture-fundable companies.

ATDC is part of the Enterprise Innovation Institute (EI2) at Georgia Tech, which helps Georgia enterprises improve their competitiveness through the application of science, technology and innovation.  ATDC currently has three facilities; two at Georgia Tech’s main campus in Atlanta, and one at Georgia Tech’s satellite campus in Savannah.

Research News & Publications Office
Enterprise Innovation Institute
Georgia Institute of Technology
75 Fifth Street, N.W., Suite 314
Atlanta, Georgia 30308 USA

Media Relations Contact: Michael Boardman (877-746-2723); e-mail: (pr@simcraft.com).

Writer: Nancy Fullbright

 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

Fleming Interviewed About ATDC Showcase

Stephen Fleming, vice president of EI2, was interviewed by TechDrawl about the upcoming ATDC Showcase. The event, to be held on Monday, May 24, at the Georgia Tech Hotel & Conference Center, will celebrate the class of 2010 and its 30th anniversary.  Founded in 1980, ATDC has helped create millions of dollars in tax revenues by graduating more than 120 companies, which together have raised more than a billion dollars in outside financing.

Watch the interview here.

For more information about the Showcase, click here.

ATDC Company Featured in Techview Atlanta

ATDC company Khush was recently featured in Techview Atlanta for its intelligent music application LaDiDa, a reverse karaoke iPhone application that analyzes sung vocals and composes matching accompaniment. Using artificial intelligence, the application analyzes the voice of the person singing into the phone and plays it back with appropriate music.

Khush was founded in May 2009 as one of Shotput Ventures’ first class of eight companies. It raised a total so far of about $129,000 from a Shotput seed investment, a grant from Georgia Tech’s VentureLab, and an angel investment from Rackspace executive Pat Matthews.

To read the entire article, click here.

 

ATDC Graduate Company Recognized by White House

Suniva, a Georgia-based manufacturer of advanced solar cells, was recognized by Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu as “An American Success Story” on his White House blog.

The entry followed Chu’s visit to the Georgia Institute of Technology, where Suniva’s technology was developed.

The company, which designs, manufactures and markets advanced solar energy cells, is the brainchild of Ajeet Rohatgi, director of the University Center of Excellence for Photovoltaic Research and Education at Georgia Tech. Suniva is a graduate member of the Advanced Technology Development Center (ATDC), a start-up accelerator that helps Georgia technology entrepreneurs launch and build successful companies. ATDC is part of the Enterprise Innovation Institute (EI2) at Georgia Tech, which helps Georgia enterprises improve their competitiveness through the application of science, technology and innovation.  ATDC currently has three facilities; two at Georgia Tech’s main campus in Atlanta, and one at Georgia Tech’s satellite campus in Savannah.

To read Secretary Chu’s full blog entry, click here.

Announcing 2010 Graduate Members for the 30th Anniversary ATDC Showcase

More than 1,000 technology leaders, university leaders, investors and aspiring entrepreneurs are expected to witness emerging technology company members and graduate members exhibit their innovative technologies and successes at this year’s Advanced Technology Development Center Startup Showcase. The event, which is celebrating 30 years of the ATDC’s dedication to growing technology companies in Georgia, will be held Monday, May 24, from 1:30 p.m. until 4:30 p.m. at the Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center.

“We are proud of this group of startup companies and the level of success they have achieved; they are representative of the types of companies that have been successful during the first 30 years of our existence,” said Stephen Fleming, vice president and director of the ATDC. “As we open our doors to a larger number of quality entrepreneurs and startup companies, we believe that the number of companies that we can assist will grow.”

Each year ATDC member companies that have attained rigorous growth milestones are selected to graduate from the startup incubator. The 2010 graduating companies are:

* CommerceV3, a provider of an order-management system that allows users to create, launch and grow customized web storefronts;

* Endgame Systems, an organization of highly-skilled information security veterans providing advanced vulnerability research programs and next-generation security solutions;

* Izenda, a company that delivers a fully-integrable add-on to software developers that gives end users the ability to create and customize reports; and

* PureWire, a web security software-as-a-service vendor that secures business and social interactions on the web.

For more information about the Showcase or to RSVP, please contact Melissa Zbeeb at melissa.zbeeb@atdc.org or visit www.atdc.org/showcase. The cost of the event is $10 per person.

About the ATDC:

The Advanced Technology Development Center (ATDC) is a startup accelerator that helps Georgia technology entrepreneurs launch and build successful companies. Founded in 1980, ATDC has helped create millions of dollars in tax revenues by graduating more than 120 companies, which together have raised more than a billion dollars in outside financing. ATDC has provided business incubation and acceleration services to hundreds of Georgia startups – most of which are not based on Georgia Tech research, but which benefit from the close proximity to the university.

Recently ATDC expanded its mission by merging with Georgia Tech’s VentureLab and with the Georgia Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Assistance Program. This change has enabled ATDC to greatly extend its reach to serve more technology companies along multiple growth paths and at all stages of development. ATDC has opened its membership to all technology entrepreneurs in Georgia, from those at the earliest conception stage to the well-established, venture-fundable companies.

ATDC is part of the Enterprise Innovation Institute (EI2) at Georgia Tech, which helps Georgia enterprises improve their competitiveness through the application of science, technology and innovation. ATDC currently has three facilities; two at Georgia Tech’s main campus in Atlanta, and one at Georgia Tech’s satellite campus in Savannah.

Research News & Publications Office

Enterprise Innovation Institute

Georgia Institute of Technology

75 Fifth Street, N.W., Suite 314

Atlanta, Georgia 30308 USA

Media Relations Contact: John Toon (404-894-6986); E-mail (john.toon@innovate.gatech.edu).

Writer: Nancy Fullbright

Changing the World: Forbes Lists ATDC Among the World’s Top Incubators

 

Forbes Magazine has named Georgia Tech’s science and technology startup accelerator, the Advanced Technology Development Center (ATDC), to its new list of the “ten technology incubators that are changing the world.”  ATDC is the only incubator in the Southeast to be included on the Forbes list.

In its brief description of ATDC, Forbes noted that the program has graduated more than 120 companies since 1980 and that companies associated with ATDC have collectively raised more than $1 billion in outside financing.  “The companies are heavy with Georgia Tech alumni,” the magazine noted, “but that’s not a requirement.”

According to Forbes, the United States has more than 300 incubators that host approximately 6,000 companies.  Many of them associated with universities, the incubators provide a broad range of support, from shared laboratory equipment to accounting and secretarial support, the magazine said.

Incubators like the ATDC, Forbes added, “are increasingly drawing intellectual capital from around the world.”  The magazine said it worked with CB Insights, a New York firm that tracks private-company funding trends – including venture capital private equity and government-backed deals – to select 10 “especially crackling innovation hubs.”

Forbes is the third leading U.S business publication to cite ATDC’s record of success in helping Georgia entrepreneurs.  Inc. Magazine and BusinessWeek had earlier included ATDC on their lists of leading incubators.

Part of Georgia Tech’s Enterprise Innovation Institute, the ATDC now has more than 300 companies in its program.  ATDC helps Georgia technology entrepreneurs launch and build successful companies.  As part of its incubation and acceleration services, ATDC helps Georgia Tech faculty members and researchers form new companies based on intellectual property developed in the Institute’s $500 million-per-year research program.  ATDC also helps companies compete for and win federal grants through the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program.

“Startups play an essential role in creating new jobs and growing the economy,” noted Stephen Fleming, Georgia Tech vice provost and executive director of the Enterprise Innovation Institute.  “We are proud of the many companies that have emerged from ATDC – and those currently in our program that are Georgia’s technology leaders of the future.”

On May 24th, ATDC will celebrate its 30th anniversary at its annual startup showcase and celebration.  That makes the Forbes honor especially timely, Fleming noted.

“As ATDC prepares to celebrate its 30th anniversary, this recognition demonstrates that it remains relevant and important to the entrepreneur community in Georgia,” he said.  “As we enjoy this attention, we thank those who have supported ATDC over many years: the Georgia General Assembly, the Georgia Research Alliance, the Georgia Tech administration and all of the volunteers who have shared their time and expertise with companies.  Becoming one of the top programs in the world required long-term investment by many people and organizations.”

Other incubator programs cited in the Forbes list were:

  • The Environmental Business Cluster (San Jose, CA)
  • Houston Technology Center (Houston, TX)
  • The IceHouse (Auckland, New Zealand)
  • Massachusetts Biomedical Initiatives (Worcester, MA)
  • Palo Alto Research Center (Palo Alto, CA)
  • The Research Park at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign (Champaign, IL)
  • The Technology Innovation Center (Evanston, IL)
  • University Research Park & MGE Innovation Center at the University of Wisconsin (Madison, WI)
  • Y Combinator (Mountain View, CA)

Ennis One of Atlanta’s Top 100 Black Women of Influence

Donna Ennis, project director of the Georgia Minority Business Enterprise Center (GMBEC), has been named one of Atlanta’s Top 100 Black Women of Influence by the Atlanta Business League.

Donna Ennis, project director of the MBDA Business Center, Atlanta, Georgia (MBC), was named one of Atlanta’s Top 100 Black Women of Influence.

Donna Ennis, project director of the MBDA Business Center, Atlanta, Georgia (MBC), has been named one of Atlanta’s Top 100 Black Women of Influence by the Atlanta Business League. Funded by the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Minority Business Development Agency and operated by Georgia Tech’s Enterprise Innovation Institute, MBC helps emerging and existing minority businesses experience significant growth and sustainability and generate long-term economic impact through the creation of jobs and revenue.

Since 1994, the Atlanta Business League has published its annual list of “Atlanta’s Top 100 Black Women of Influence.” The list include black women in the metro Atlanta community who have reached senior level positions within their professions, are leading entrepreneurs in their industries or have attained the ability to influence large public bodies politically. In addition to professional accomplishments, the “100 Black Women of Influence” have demonstrated their commitment to the citizenry of Metro Atlanta by maintaining significant involvement and participation in community and civic activities.

“Donna Ennis was selected as one of Atlanta’s Top 100 Black Women of Influence because of her commitment and dedication to growing minority businesses,” said Leona Barr-Davenport, Atlanta Business League president and CEO. “Very simply put, she cares and is results oriented. Her work speaks for itself!”

Ennis is responsible for the strategic direction, marketing and outreach, and operations of the GMBEC and assists clients with strategic, business and market planning; marketing research and communications; public and private procurement, finance and operations; and business process improvement. She has more than 25 years of experience in marketing, communications, public relations and business development, with emphasis on identifying company needs and matching them to the appropriate resources.

“The Georgia Minority Business Enterprise Center plays a vital role in facilitating the growth of both emerging and established minority businesses in Georgia,” noted Stephen Fleming, vice provost in the Georgia Tech Enterprise Innovation Institute. “Donna Ennis has been the driving force behind the Center’s success, and I am pleased to see her hard work and dedication recognized in this way.”

Ennis is also a member of the board of directors of the Georgia Resource Capital and the National Center for the Prevention of Home Improvement Fraud and on the board of trustees of Atlanta Unity Church. She has a bachelor’s degree in communications from Boston University and a master’s degree in public administration from Georgia State University.

For more information on GMBEC services offered by Georgia Tech’s Enterprise Innovation Institute, contact Donna Ennis (404-894-2096); E-mail: (donna.ennis@innovate.gatech.edu); Web site: (www.georgiambc.org).

About Enterprise Innovation Institute:
The Georgia Tech Enterprise Innovation Institute helps companies, entrepreneurs, economic developers and communities improve their competitiveness through the application of science, technology and innovation. It is one of the most comprehensive university-based programs of business and industry assistance, technology commercialization and economic development in the nation.

Research News & Publications Office
Enterprise Innovation Institute
Georgia Institute of Technology
75 Fifth Street, N.W., Suite 314
Atlanta, Georgia 30308 USA

Media Relations Contact:  John Toon (404-894-6986); E-mail (john.toon@innovate.gatech.edu).

Writer: Nancy Fullbright

First Georgia Tech Edison Prize Goes to Startup Company Working to Prevent Pressure Ulcers

A Georgia Tech startup company being formed to commercialize a new device that could help prevent pressure ulcers in hospital and nursing home patients has won the first Georgia Tech Edison Prize. The $15,000 prize will help launch the new company, which will be known as Multispectral Imagers.

Image shows a custom filter on a CMOS camera chip that makes up the new multispectral imager developed to detect early stages of pressure ulcers.

A Georgia Tech startup company being formed to commercialize a new device that could help prevent pressure ulcers in hospital and nursing home patients has won the first Georgia Tech Edison Prize. The $15,000 prize will help launch the new company, which will be known as Multispectral Imagers.

Treatment of pressure ulcers costs an estimated $8 billion each year in the United States alone, but the painful skin injury can be prevented if detected early. The device, a hand-held multispectral imaging system that provides data in real-time, could be used by health care professionals to detect signs of pressure ulcers before they can be seen with conventional visual screening techniques — especially on patients with darker skin.

“We have developed a novel multispectral imager that can be integrated onto a chip,” said Fengtao Wang, a Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering graduate student who explained the company’s plan to a judging panel. “We can deliver a compact, real-time and low-cost multispectral imager to detect erythema at an early stage.”

The device would be marketed to clinics, nursing homes, rehabilitation centers, hospitals and other facilities that treat patients whose mobility problems can result in development of pressure ulcers. In addition to the medical applications, Wang said the device may also have military, agricultural, manufacturing and environmental uses.

In addition to Wang, the company team includes Ali Adibi and Fuhan Liu in the Georgia Tech School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Linghua Kong and Stephen Sprigle of the Center for Assistive Technology and Environmental Access (CATEA) in the Georgia Tech College of Architecture. Adibi and Sprigle are both professors; Kong is a senior faculty engineer and Liu is research engineer.

The Georgia Tech Edison Prize was established to encourage formation of startup companies based on technology developed at Georgia Tech, and was made possible by a multi-year grant from the Charles A. Edison Fund, named for the inventor’s son. Awarding of the first Georgia Tech Edison Prize was part of the Georgia Tech Graduate Research and Innovation Conference held February 8.

“Thomas Edison often receives credit for inventing the electric light bulb, but his real accomplishment was in making that device — along with the phonograph and motion picture camera — commercially successful to create new companies and new industries,” said Stephen Fleming, Georgia Tech’s vice provost for economic development and technology ventures. “Through the Edison Prize, we want to advance this kind of company-producing technology commercialization at Georgia Tech.”

The Georgia Tech Edison Fund, which is managed by Fleming, also provides seed funding to startup companies that have a close association with Georgia Tech.

“The judges for the first Georgia Tech Edison Prize heard a number of excellent presentations,” Fleming explained. “The judges selected Fengtao Wang because he had successfully identified an un-served market for the product and had begun approaching potential partners to commercialize the technology. Innovation is ultimately about turning knowledge into money.”

Approximately 100 entries were received for the prize competition from among the 300 graduate students who submitted posters to the Graduate Research and Innovation Conference. Those entries were evaluated by a committee of entrepreneurs, venture capitalists and Georgia Tech faculty to create a list of 11 finalists. Those finalists were each invited to make presentations to a judging committee, which selected the winner announced at a reception on the evening of February 8.

The judging committee included:

* Jamie Bardin, former CEO of EZ-Prints
* Nelson Chu, general partner of Kinetic Ventures
* Merrick Furst, distinguished professor in the Georgia Tech College of Computing
* Gary Lee, former CEO of Flexlight Systems
* Keith McGreggor, manager of technology evaluation in the ATDC
* Nina Sawczuk, assistant director for biosciences in the ATDC
* Jim Stratigos, president of Broadband Strategies

About the Enterprise Innovation Institute:
The Georgia Tech Enterprise Innovation Institute helps companies, entrepreneurs, economic developers and communities improve their competitiveness through the application of science, technology and innovation. It is one of the most comprehensive university-based programs of business and industry assistance, technology commercialization and economic development in the nation.

Research News & Publications Office
Georgia Institute of Technology
75 Fifth Street, N.W., Suite 314
Atlanta, Georgia 30308 USA

Media Relations Contact: John Toon (404-894-6986); E-mail: (jtoon@gatech.edu).

Writer: John Toon

Growing the Southeast’s First Photovoltaics Firm

John W. Baumstark (left), CEO of Suniva, the Southeast’s first photovoltaics company, poses with Ajeet Rohatgi, founder, in the company’s manufacturing facility in Norcross. Based on technology developed at Georgia Tech, the company received assistance from the Enterprise Innovation Institute.